The Ultimate Guide to New York’s Five Boroughs

Other local businesses to check out include independent bookstore and wine bar The Lit Bar (thelitbar.com); Bronx Native (bronxnative.com), a clothing line in homage to the territory of the creators; Mottley Kitchen (mottleykitchen.com), a cafe with rooftop yoga and fresh juice; and the Port Morris Distillery (portmorrisdistillery.com), which draws hundreds of visitors every weekend for its pitorro, otherwise known as Puerto Rican moonshine.

Getting There

Take the 1, 2, 5, B, or D subway lines north to reach the Bronx, or the Metro-North commuter rail from Grand Central Station

Where to stay

Wingate by Wyndham (001 929 526 5900; wyndhamhotels.com) offers double rooms from £133 per night

queens

Some of the best views of the Manhattan skyline are from Gantry Plaza State Park (parks.ny.gov) in Long Island City. But it would be doing this borough a disservice to use it only as a vantage point over its more glitzy neighbor. Queens is one of the most ethnically diverse boroughs in the United States, with more languages ​​spoken here than anywhere else on the planet. This diversity generates an extremely rich food culture with 6,000 restaurants representing 120 nationalities. If nothing else, come here to eat your way around the world.

Corona is famous for its Latin American cuisines; Elmhurst turns more Pan-Asian; and Jackson Heights is the go-to for Indians, Mexicans, Nepalese and more. Queens’ Chinatown, Flushing, is the largest outside of Asia. The New World Mall food court (newworldmallny.com), meanwhile, is the benchmark for affordable and varied Chinese cuisine.

If navigating between momos and chivitos is overwhelming, Culinary Backstreets (culinarybackstreets.com) offers a walking food tour of Queens to help you find that hole-in-the-wall Thai restaurant you might otherwise skip. Another way to sample it all is to head to Queens Night Market (queensnightmarket.com) in Flushing Meadows’ Corona Park on a Saturday, with live music and food capped at $5 (£4).

In the leafy residential neighborhood of Ridgewood, gentrification has begun to cross the border from Bushwick to Brooklyn. Versatile art venue Nowadays (nowadays.nyc), with its huge outdoor space and dance parties, has a lot to do with change. Recent restaurant openings such as Rolo’s (rolosnyc.com) and Pizzeria Panina (theinfatuation.com), both led by impressive hospitality talent, aim to create long-running neighborhood eateries rather than instant hits.

But Queens is more than its food (or, at least, between meals there is entertainment). The contemporary art institution MoMA PS1 (moma.org) is certainly partly responsible for heralding a new era in Long Island City, such has been its impact. In Astoria, the Museum of the Moving Image (movingimage.us), with its permanent Jim Henson exhibit, is an immersive audiovisual experience too often overlooked. And the Louis Armstrong House of Corona (louisarmstronghouse.org) is being expanded to create a new cultural center, set to debut later this year.

Queens extends to the Rockaways, a 10-mile-long peninsula of sandy beaches just an A-train ride from the city. Devastated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the Rockaways have experienced a creative resurgence, with cute beach shops like Swellife (theswellife.com) selling global blankets and textiles, stylish bistros like Bar Maseille (barmarseille.com ) and cool community hubs, including the Locals Collective (localscollectivenyc.com), a surf school, cafe and shop – the HQ of a disheveled beach crowd.

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